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D.6. Markup for Metadata

D.6.1. Crediting Translators, Converters and Co-authors

There are several ways that these folks, as well as other contributors to your document, can be given some recognition for the help they've given you.

D.6.1.1. <othercredit>

All translators, converters and co-authors should be credited with an <othercredit> tag entry. To properly credit a translator or converter, use the <othercredit> tag with the role attribute set to "converter" or "translator", as indicated in the example below:

Example D-8. Other Credit

 <othercredit role='converter'>
  <firstname>David</firstname> 
  <surname>Merrill</surname> 
  <contrib>Conversion from HTML to DocBook v3.1 (SGML).</contrib>
</othercredit>

D.6.1.2. Crediting Editors and Reviewers

To help track the review process all new documents must include a reference to the reviewers for the technical, language and metadata reviews.

Example D-9. Editor

 <editor>
  <firstname>Tabatha</firstname> 
  <surname>Marshall</surname> 
  <contrib>Language review of version 0.8</contrib>
</editor>

D.6.2. <revremark>s

Within the <revision> tag hierarchy is a tag called <revremark>. Within this tag, you can make any brief notes you wish about each particular revision of your document.

D.6.3. Revision History

The <revhistory> tag should be used to denote the various revisions of the document. Specify the date, revision number and comments regarding what has changed.

Revisions should be listed with the most-recent version at the top (list in descending order).

D.6.4. Date formats

The <pubdate> tag in your header should list the publication date of this particular version of the document (coincide with the revision date). It should be in the following format:

<pubdate>2002-04-25</pubdate>

The date is in the format YYYY-MM-DD, which is one of the ISO 8601 standard formats for representing dates. For you Yanks out there (me too), think of it as going from the largest unit of time to the smallest.

D.6.5. Sample Article (or Book) Information Element

Here is a sample of a complete DocBook (SGML or XML) <articleinfo> element which contains some of the items and constructs previously described.

Example D-10. Sample Meta Data

 <!--
   Above these lines in a typical DocBook article would be the article
   element (the immediate parent of the articleinfo element) and above
   that typically, the DOCTYPE declaration and internal subset.
  -->

<articleinfo>

  <!-- 
  	Use "HOWTO", "mini HOWTO", "FAQ" in title, if appropriate
  --> 
  
<title>Sample HOWTO</title>

<author>   
	<firstname>Your Firstname</firstname>
	<surname>Your Surname</surname>
	<affiliation>
		<address><email>your email</email></address>
		</affiliation>
</author>

<editor>
  <firstname>Tabatha</firstname> 
  <surname>Marshall</surname> 
  <contrib>Language review of version 0.8</contrib>
</editor>

<othercredit role='converter'>
  <firstname>David</firstname> 
  <surname>Merrill</surname> 
  <contrib>Conversion from HTML to DocBook v3.1 (SGML).</contrib>
</othercredit>

   <pubdate>YYYY-MM-DD</pubdate>

	<revhistory>
		<revision>
		<revnumber>1.0</revnumber>
		<date>YYYY-MM-DD</date>
		<authorinitials>ABC</authorinitials>
		</revremark>first official release</revremark>
		</revision>
		
		<revision>
		<revnumber>0.9</revnumber>
		<date>YYYY-MM-DD</date>
		<authorinitials>ABC</authorinitials>
		<revremark>First draft</revremark>
		</revision>
	</revhistory>

   <!-- 
		Provide a good abstract; a couple of sentences is sufficient
   -->

  <abstract>    
		<para>
       This is a sample DocBook (SGML or XML) HOWTO which has been
       constructed to serve as a template.
		</para>
	</abstract>

</articleinfo>

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